How Not to Change Someone's Mind

How Not to Change Someone's Mind

When you're selling something, you don't start by telling the person how bad what they already have is.

If you are trying to sell them a car, you don't tell them the one they're driving is a junker. If you are trying to sell them a set of knives, you don't go right out and say the set they have is useless.

Think about it from the side of the person being sold to. I don't know about you, but if someone starts telling me what I have is bad, my first reaction is to try to prove them wrong. I feel like you're telling me I'm bad at making decisions — like I'm not good enough to have already purchased the right product.

You start by showing them the benefits of what you're selling, not the weaknesses of what they already have.

When that happens, the person analyzes it for what it is. They're not on the defense, they're just listening.

But once you give them a picture of what they could have, it makes them realize that their current product is not near as good.

Rather than trying to force them into your perspective, they're allowed to come to the conclusion on their own.

The same goes for trying to convince someone of your worldview.

If you're trying to convince someone of the truth of Christianity, you don't go right out and tell them everything wrong with their religion. You start by telling them how awesome Christianity is.

They may come back with reasons why their worldview is better, and you can answer those, but that's not where you should start. Human nature doesn't allow it.

If you want to sell someone your ideas, you can't start by demonizing theirs.

Truth, Beauty, and C.S. Lewis

Truth, Beauty, and C.S. Lewis

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