Can We Really Know Truth?

Can We Really Know Truth?

I sometimes wonder why I think I'm ever right about anything. As life moves on, I'm constantly discovering new information, molding my worldview to fit the new reality.

As that happens more and more, I start to wonder, Can I ever really know what's true and what's not?

This uncertainty is not unfounded. Many philosophers have gone down this line of thinking and concluded that no, we can't really know anything.

This conclusion, though, is unlivable. In order to progress through life, we have to assume we can know truth. Constant questioning of every thought can only lead to the inability to act. Ultimately, the idea that we can't know truth would lead to an extreme indecisiveness only to be described as mental illness.

How, then, does a Christian make sense of this?

The Bible assumes we're able to know things. It even speaks of God leading us to truth.

So, if we assume the Bible is true, then we can know truth. It can form the bedrock, giving us confidence in our ability to discover reality.

That may seem to some a shallow argument. You can't solve an intellectual problem by tossing in an arbitrary assumption.

My assumption, though, is not arbitrary. I have good reason to believe Christianity is true. And the alternatives don't give me any good bedrock for belief in truth itself.

If there is no God, there's no reason to think we can trust our thoughts. They're simply neurons firing, causing things to happen, which then cause more neurons to fire. Simply atoms bouncing around, moving life forward. No choice, no action, simply movement.

In this world, our thoughts aren't ours. So the "truth" we come to isn't truth at all.

Christianity provides a grounding for logic. It says we can trust it. It says reasoning works. It says that, while we're fallen, and won't get everything right, we can discover truth, especially if we truly seek it.

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